Solomon Thomas, NY Jets, Raiders, Stats, PFF
Solomon Thomas, New York Jets, Las Vegas Raiders, Getty Images

Solomon Thomas rejoins Robert Saleh with New York Jets

According to Brian Costello of the New York Post, the New York Jets are signing free-agent defensive lineman Solomon Thomas, who played under Robert Saleh for four years while Saleh was the San Francisco 49ers’ defensive coordinator.

ESPN’s Adam Schefter adds that Thomas will sign a one-year deal.

Thomas and Saleh both joined the 49ers in 2017. San Francisco selected Thomas with the third overall pick in the 2017 NFL draft.

The Stanford product was a regular contributor to San Francisco’s defensive line rotation but never fulfilled his lofty potential, collecting 6.0 sacks over four seasons. Thomas joined the Las Vegas Raiders for the 2021 season.

Let’s dig into Thomas’ player profile and figure out what the Jets are getting in the 26-year-old.

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Solomon Thomas played a brand-new role in 2021

Thomas possesses a tweener frame at 6-foot-3 and 280 pounds. He’s just big enough to warrant snaps on the interior and just small enough to warrant snaps on the edge, although he’s not necessarily a picture-perfect fit for either role.

Throughout his four years with the 49ers, Thomas was deployed in a hybrid role that saw him rotate between the interior and the edge. For example, in the 2019 season (Thomas’ last healthy season with San Francisco), Thomas played 57.1% of his snaps on the interior and 42.9% on the edge.

The Raiders switched things up for Thomas in 2021. Las Vegas moved Thomas to the interior on a full-time basis, as he was asked to play just 2.3% of his snaps on the edge.

In his new role as a defensive tackle, Thomas experienced mixed results. He had a respectable season as a pass-rusher but struggled mightily in the run game.

As a pass-rusher, Thomas set new career-highs in sacks (3.5), quarterback hits (12), and pass deflections (2) while recording his first career strip-sack. Thomas collected 30 total pressures over 381 pass-rush snaps, giving him a pressure rate of 7.9% that ranked 50th out of 121 qualified interior defensive linemen (59th percentile).

Per Pro Football Focus, Thomas also had a pass-rush win rate of 11.1%, which placed 46th out of 121 qualified IDL (63rd percentile). So, across the board, his pass-rushing numbers were solid.

The flip side of Thomas’ pass-rushing performance was his play against the run, where his undersized frame for the defensive tackle position caused him to be a liability.

With 18 tackles and five missed tackles against the run, Thomas had a missed tackle rate of 21.7% in the run game, ranking 133rd out of 140 qualified IDL (5th percentile). His Pro Football Focus run-defense grade of 28.1 ranked second-worst among that group.

The Raiders were aware of Thomas’ deficiencies against the run, as they rarely placed him on the field in rushing situations. Only 30.9% of Thomas’ snaps came on a run play. That was the seventh-lowest rate among qualified IDL.

How did Solomon Thomas do in his hybrid role with the 49ers?

The 2021 season showed us what Thomas is capable of doing as a defensive tackle. He was a pass-rushing specialist who could provide decent output in the passing game but had to be kept off the field in rushing situations.

But what can he do in a hybrid role?

Thomas produced incredibly “meh” results during his 49ers career. His run-stuffing wasn’t nearly as bad as it was with the Raiders but his pass-rushing wasn’t nearly as good. Overall, he was generally below-average in both phases.

From 2017-20, Thomas had 70 total pressures on 1,036 pass-rush snaps, which is a pressure rate of 6.8%. For reference, the 2021 league average for interior defensive linemen was 7.3% and the league average for edge rushers was 10.2%, so a 6.8% pressure rate would be slightly below-average for an IDL and poor for an EDGE.

As a run defender, Thomas was far more effective when he got frequent chances to use his size to his advantage by playing on the edge in rushing situations. Thomas earned a composite PFF run-defense grade of 63.0 from 2017-20, which is slightly above average for both the EDGE and IDL positions.

Look for Solomon Thomas to provide depth and scheme familiarity in New York

Expectations for Solomon Thomas should not be very high. He’s been deployed in various roles over five NFL seasons and has yet to show high-end starter potential in any of them. Despite his status as a former top-three pick, there doesn’t seem to be a whole lot of untapped potential left inside of him.

However, Thomas has shown that he is capable of being a useful rotational piece in a 4-3 defensive front. He’s got experience playing under Robert Saleh and can handle a variety of different responsibilities at a competent level.

To get the most out of Thomas, New York would be wise to play him to his strengths.

As an edge defender, Thomas can defend the run well but will not do much in the passing game. As an interior defender, he is a good pass-rusher but will be bullied in the run game.

Accordingly, the Jets should try to use Thomas as an edge defender in rushing situations and as an interior defender in passing situations.

Look for Thomas to provide decent depth at multiple positions for the Jets’ defensive line.

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Michael Nania is one of the best analytical New York Jets minds in the world, combining his statistical expertise with game film to add proper context to the data. Nania scrapes every corner, ensuring you know all there is to know about everyone from the QB to the long snapper. Nania's Numbers, Nania's QB Grades, and Nania's All-22 give fans a deeper and more well-rounded dive into the Jets than anyone else can offer. Email: michael.nania[at]jetsxfactor.com - Twitter: @Michael_Nania
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Peter Buell
Peter Buell
6 months ago

If we can reverse deals somewhat with Seattle for DK Metcalf with this years #10 (Seattle’s pick) and a 2023 3rd rounder gotta jump all over it!
Looking forward to Wilson airing it out after dinking and dunking for a while. Keep the D guessing.
Start at the 25..get it to the 49, 2nd and 1 and hit Metcalf deep for 6.
. Moore Jones and Berrios along with our new two solid TE plus Carter bouncing off tackles, turning 3 into 6-7 yards, having a deep threat will give us what we expected out of Zack

Jimjets
Jimjets
6 months ago

Prolly means goodbye to Kyle Philippe I’d guess. And I imagine we’ll look to replace Rankins in the draft. Nice little pick up.

Jets71
Jets71
6 months ago
Reply to  Jimjets

I’m not in a hurry to get rid of Rankins. I know he was less than what we expected but I’d hang on to him. Phillips just doesn’t fit in this 4-3.

Jimjets
Jimjets
6 months ago
Reply to  Jets71

Gotta see more from Rankins though.

Jets71
Jets71
6 months ago
Reply to  Jimjets

Yes, I agree and I think we will see more from him this season.

Freedom1789
Freedom1789
6 months ago
Reply to  Jimjets

My understanding is we just paid him 1.25 million of his money. Don’t think he’ll be going anywhere unless something strange happens.

Jimjets
Jimjets
6 months ago
Reply to  Freedom1789

Woody can sell more q-tips. 🙂